Trayvon Martin: Martyr… Maybe Not

Posted: July 20, 2013 in Social Commentary
Tags: , , ,

Trayvor Martin: Martyr … Maybe Not
By R.C. Seely

I’ve been reading some the replies to the George Zimmerman trial and I have to say I’m more than a little concerned here.  Originally I wasn’t going to make a statement, but wait until it all blew over and for us all to move on.  Since that is not happening, then this is a plea for commonsense.
First, when brought up if it’s called the George Zimmerman trial, not the Trayvon Martin trial.  Many are not clear about that, and when asked think these are not connected.  When asked by interviewers about George Zimmerman the reply is, “Oh I haven’t been following that case.”  Trayvon is mentioned, however, the response is in the effect of, “Oh yeah, Trayvon.  Isn’t that sad that we are still such a racist country?” Okay, for the record, any death of a human being is sad, but the greater tragedy here is the assault on humanity.
From the onset of this case, the events were claimed as racist, now that’s sad!  As the information has gotten out about the case, it’s looking less and less racist.  There’s simply nothing pointing to racism in Zimmerman’s background.  But also calling this a white on black crime isn’t accurate, he’s Hispanic.  Where the hell are the PC police on this one?  So this is a case of one minority killing another minority, not a case of whitey murdering another brotha.  All this is telling of the larger picture of acceptable victim hood that is rampant in our culture.
One of the first arguments I see posted is, “unless you’re black, you don’t understand.”  You would be right, I wouldn’t understand your cultural woes as an ethnic minority- but what of it?  Just because I can’t understand how it feels, doesn’t mean those of the group in question should get a free pass on spreading racially charged rhetoric without being debate it’s merits.  I want some examples of discrimination they are suffering.  The only one I’ve heard is that they have had a hard time getting a job.  So the immediate conclusion is this is racism?  Who isn’t having a hard time finding work, no matter the skin color?  It’s called a recession, maybe you’ve heard of it?
One of the suggestions was that by discussing racism we are keeping racism alive.  That’s valid point and if it wasn’t it is worthy of a legitimate consideration.  What was the response to it? – Mostly with condensation and outright ridicule.  Probably the most absurd counter to it was to the effect of “if we stop talking about cancer will that die off too?”  Really?  Comparing racism (a social stigma) to cancer (a biological disorder), is that really a valid comparison?  That’s like comparing someone with a cold to the suffering of an AIDS patient.  If I were suffering from cancer and heard this kind of hyperbole, I would be fuming.  More to the point, it demonstrates the victim hood culture I’m talking about.  One part is valid about that comparison, with both cancer and racism, attitude means a lot.  If a cancer sufferer can be kept uplifted through the whole ordeal they have a far better chance of recovery.  If the racial dialogue is kept to a cool, rational debate, instead of the reactionary demagoguery of the Trayvor Martin death, than the solutions can be reached.
We have all suffered discrimination, of some form or another, at some point of our lives.  Being rejected by someone because of your physical appearance.  Turned down for job because someone with more experience or education comes along.  Being isolated in your own community because you’re not of the common religion.  Avoided because your personality clashes with others.  At times, yes, racial discriminations too will, unfortunately, come up as well.  Racial discrimination is not a one way streak though.  The Black Panthers are just as much a hate group as the Ku Klux Klan, and are just as wrong for it.  Jesse Jackson and Al Sharpton, could have followed the tradition of Martin Luther King Jr. – instead, they are pillars of the some racial division that they claim to condemn.  Jackson has stated that he himself would not comfortable with an urban black youth trailing behind him in the dark; he would be if it were a white man.  So, the man considered the human megaphone for racial sensitivity, is in essence saying he might do the same thing.  Where’s the anger at these comments?  How is this obvious intolerance, considered tolerable?
So, was what happened that night an act of racial intolerance?  Maybe.  If so, on which side, could if have been Trayvon that instigated the issue with previous actions in the community?  He had a history of gang activity, is it possible he started the fight?  Only Zimmerman and Trayvon know for sure.  As I stated earlier, the greater tragedy is the assault on humanity.  I only hope that humanity can have a quick recovery, because it appears it is needed more now than ever.

Property of MOJO Publishing 2013

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